Engineers are taking over marketing

Art
Original: Jean Tinguely, Alles beweegt! (Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 2.0)

I have written about the paradigm shift in sales before. Two-thirds of the sales process happens online now, and customers are already quite knowledgeable when they contact the seller. This provides a great opportunity for subject matter experts, first in supporting online visibility with quality content and, second, in acting as a trusted advisor when the customer engages with the seller. Overall it is a great opportunity for interested engineers to stand out and change the generally reluctant attitude towards sales among subject matter experts.

But if the sales climate is changing, so is marketing. The role of marketing has been pretty stable for a long time; from the engineer’s point of view, it is usually a somewhat disconnected function working with vague, unmeasurable concepts. The disconnectedness can be seen in two organizational areas. First, from the product development perspective, marketing usually takes the product market fit pretty much as given, driving customer focus, but without close collaboration on product requirements. Second, from the sales perspective, marketing usually throws in the towel a bit too early, for example, providing leads but not being accountable for the outcome. As a result of these two factors marketing, as important it is, often ends up in a non-measurable vacuum.

In the digital world, engineering will re-connect marketing with these internal processes. As all products, services, and processes become more and more digital, it is not enough that marketing drives customer focus from the outside: marketing need to get involved in product definition and dimensions like user experience, analytics, and distribution will need to be engineered into the core of the product and the company. Moreover, analytics will penetrate everything, including the measurement of marketing effectiveness. With all the new sensors, tracking, and big data capabilities available, many previously “black box” marketing activities will become predictable, measurable, and consequently accountable for results—a form of engineering science.

The new engineered marketing, also known as growth hacking, already has had plenty of good success stories, including Amazon, Airbnb, and Uber, not to mention Finn’s own Supercell. The challenge is that these success stories always tend to be the same greenfield startups operating in the consumer market. Could Supercell’s success be replicated in B2B market by an established company? I think so. Do you want to discuss?

It happens that the theme of the next Sales Engineering Finland Meetup is Engineers in Marketing. Please join us, grab the opportunity, and lead the way toward changing Finnish engineering culture!

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